Dress The Iconics — Lem

I had been working on a post to dress Lem, using a lot of Balmain: elaborate jackets, skinny jeans, and a ton of swagger.  Looks like these:

lem2 lem1 lem3

(Balmain Fall 2010 Ready to Wear, Balmain Spring 2010 Ready to Wear, Balmain Resort 2012)

But then Saint Laurent’s 2015 Spring Menswear collection came out. And said everything I had had to say about Lem, making references to Keith Richards, Chris Robinson, Jimi Hendrix, Robert Plant, Lenny Kravitz.  I have nothing useful to add.

lemmOther looks for Lem on Pinterest.

Dress The Iconics — Crowe

Crowe is the new Bloodrager iconic.

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Chanel Fall 2008 Couture

The literal interpretation of Crowe’s look comes from Chanel. Because isn’t that what you think of when you think of raging barbarian? Actually, some of Lagerfeld’s recent work with the line has brought out the raging barbarian in some (he’s responsible for the Evil Queen of Hoth insanity), so it may be an appropriate choice after all.  The dress is grey and linear sort of evokes Crowe’s lamellar armour.  (Chanel Fall 2008 couture)

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Diana Eng 2010

 

A big feature in Crowe’s story is the occurance of violent storms that accompany his rages.  Here’s a lightening storm in dress form, courtesy of Diana Eng. (Too literal?)

 

 

 

croweRodarte gave me the most Shoanti looking thing I found.  The styling helps a lot with that, this was probably chosen as much for the clothes as for the fake tats. Rodarte Spring 2010, Ready to Wear.

 

 

 

Mathematical Proof

While trying to figure out what Crowe would wear (it turns out heavy armor wearers are pretty challenging), I worked out a mathematical proof for you enjoyment. I have proved, beyond a shadow of a doubt, that shoes are not monsters.

  1. Premise:  All shoes are monsters.
  2. Therefore, no shoe can exist that is a monster.
  3. Axiom: monsters were not made by Aboleths. (reference)
  4. shoes Clearly made by aboleths.
  5. Therefore, shoes are not monsters. QED

My 6-inch-healed-Numerian boots disagree, however.

These awesome (yet slightly sinister looking) shoes are from Iris van Herpen and Rem D Koolhaas. Like van Herpen’s previous appearance these are 3D printed.

Numerian Boots

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Numeria Boots

These showed up in my web research on Numeria and cracked me up.  Their ‘model number’ is “Numeria” and they completely fit into my reto-futurism dreams and/or expectations for Numeria.

The were only $20, so I had to buy them. But the heal (including the platform) is six inches, so I’m not sure I can ever wear them.

Now that I’ve exposed my weakness and price point, I fully expect to see more shoes in the same line:  gold gladiator sandals named ‘Osirion’, baroque satin mules named ‘Taldor’, Kick-ass motorcycle boots named ‘Belkzen’.

Numerian Sleeves

I have become completely enthralled with the sleeve worn but the member of the Technic League on pg 33 of Numeria.  This is obviously how the TL recruits new members.  With great sleeves.

The sleeve part looks like a standard 2-piece jacket sleeve down to the elbow.  The bodice part has an undersized side panel, which ends just a few inches below the armscye (The seam where the sleeve is sewn to the bodice).  I have no idea what to call this, so I’m going to go with “gusset”, even thought that’s not what it is)

The coat is made from 2 different fabrics, one for most of the coat and one for the under sleeve and gusset. Presumably, this is for ventilation or freedom of movement.

I can’t wait to reverse engineer it and see how it works.  There’s also some interesting chevroning around the waist.  I have nowhere to wear this coat, but I’m dying to figure out how it’s made.

 

Plastic in Numeria

I’m pretty excited.  But I don’t get out much.  I’ve made it up to about page 30 of Numeria (because I’m the world’s slowest reader) and found this little gem on pg 25 in the section on Corrosive Rain (emphasis mine):

Rains vary widely in what they affect, some dissolving nearly any material, others affecting only organic matter, metal, or plastics.

Unrelatedly, last week’s What If xkcd tackled the question of how much real dinosaur (via petroleum) is in a plastic toy dinosaur. Short answer: not much. He doesn’t ask the more important question: What is the AC of a polyester jumpsuit, and whether it can be raised my adding more dinosaur.