Plastic in Numeria

I’m pretty excited.  But I don’t get out much.  I’ve made it up to about page 30 of Numeria (because I’m the world’s slowest reader) and found this little gem on pg 25 in the section on Corrosive Rain (emphasis mine):

Rains vary widely in what they affect, some dissolving nearly any material, others affecting only organic matter, metal, or plastics.

Unrelatedly, last week’s What If xkcd tackled the question of how much real dinosaur (via petroleum) is in a plastic toy dinosaur. Short answer: not much. He doesn’t ask the more important question: What is the AC of a polyester jumpsuit, and whether it can be raised my adding more dinosaur.

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Report from Numeria

This weekend, I got the answers to all my burning questions about Numeria when my book arrived. And, as always, more questions were raised than answered. I’m only about 20 pages in (as of this writing), so I may have to eat my words later.

Answer to the Most important Question:

Ruffian Spring 2011 Ready to Wear

YES (with caveat):  There is polyester!  I feel foolish for even asking.  The android on page 57 is rocking a mauve and white, belted, sleeveless, double breasted, flared pantsuit.  It is exactly as glorious as it sounds.  With that description, how could it be anything other than polyester?  It looks a lot like this white suit from Ruffian’s Spring 2011 Ready to Wear collection.  Also, since she’s an android described as having “synthetic skin”, she essentially is polyester.

Louise Goldin Fall 2008 Ready to Wear

The Numerian Gunslinger  on pg 55 is wearing a standard issue superhero/speed-skater suit.  The kind that requires an amount of stretch which is unattainable with natural fibres alone.  This piece from Louise Goldin’s 2008 Fall collection displays similar amounts of stretch and contrasting seam inserts. (ETA:  The artist posted the Gunslinger image on deviant art)

From these facts, I am cautiously optimistic that there is polyester, despite no actual mention of petroleum-based fabric.

Speaking of synthetic materials:  Am I the only one hoping the Technology Guide includes recipes for making polymers, like the formulas in the Alchemist’s Handbook?

 

Open the Silver Mount doors, HAL

philippeblonde

 

This is how I want Iron Gods to start…

The Silver Mount has been acting ominously lately…  drawing a crowd of onlookers, including the intrepid adventuring party.

The pneumatic space ship doors slowly open… smoke billows out… a walk way connects to the ground…  and The Blonds spring 2014 runway show emerges from the ship.

 

00030fullscreenAlso with him… because…. reasons…. or something. It came from Fashion East‘s Fall 2010 Ready to Wear collection.  Which is another very Numerian “space tech meets barbarians, Thundarr/Mad Max” style collection.

Kellid fashion in Numeria

The Kellid people of Numeria pose an interesting fashion challenge.  On the one hand, they dress in natural hides and leathers.  On the other, they have a frikken space ship crashed in their back yard.  They’re known to distrust magic, but do they distrust technology as well?

kellidNicholas K (this one is from Fall 2013, Ready to Wear) works as well for the Kellid of Numeria as for the Kellid of Realm of the Mammoth Lords, like Amiri.

Are the Kellid who live close to the Silver Mount influenced by its fashion? As a spaceship, presumably it has clothes inside.  Do the Kellid and/or Technic League raid it for complete clothes, for materials to make clothes from, or let it alone (sartorially speaking)?

 

 

I kind of got attached to the idea of the Kellid gathering bits of detritus from the wreckage and having no use for it as technology, weaving into their clothing as adornment.  (Cliche, but there you have it)

kel3 kel2 kel4

(Alexander McQueen Spring 2014 Ready to Wear, Lanvin Spring 2011 Ready to Wear, Lanvin Fall 2009 Ready To Wear)

Will There Be Polyester?

June is rapidly approaching and a goblin’s thoughts turn to Numeria.  The campaign setting book comes out next month. So, before I get spoilered, it’s time to start making ridiculous statements about what I expect for the Fashions of Numeria.

The official boards are full of question and speculations about the region.  Mostly about lightsabers. But so far, no one has asked the Most Important Question:  Will there be polyester?  Or its less important (ie: not Fashion related) parent question:  Will there be plastic? Logic would suggest, “yes”, because (here on Earth) it’s hard to imagine building a spaceship without knowing how to process petroleum.  The Shory were able to get cities airborne using magic, but I far as I know, those weren’t space faring.

ubiquitous jumpsuitAccording to all the documentaries I’ve seen (like 2001: A Space Odyssey, Forbidden Planet, and Galaxy Quest) the first thing space faring people need are sleek, polyester jumpsuits. Jumpsuits were “a thing” on the Runways in about 2010 (*shudder*), so there were plenty to choose from.  I looked at about 300 images (who said fashion blogging was easy?) of over 2000 to find the perfect one.  I was honestly, truly trying not to use another McQueen, but this jumpsuit (from his Fall 2004 Ready to Wear collection) is Retro-Futuristic perfection.

 

3dprint

This dress is from Iris van Herpen and has a really great dark futuristic look.  Also.  It’s 3D printed. So that’s awesome.

If polyester jumpsuits don’t convince you, here’s another reason to include  plastic in Golarion. It conjures up some fantastic mental images.  The Sandpoint goblins on Junk Beach… now picture them with making nets out of old six pack rings that washed up on the beach.

Kimlé

(Lying on the couch, drinking excellent coffee, staring out the window at the rain, writing about imaginary fabric in an imaginary world, until I leave for my Pathfinder game. Today may be perfect)

As far as I can tell, kimlé gets its first mention in the Inner Sea Gods book.  It is described in the section on the clothing of Gozreh‘s worshipers:  “… at least one garment is usually made of kimlé, a linen-like cloth made of a sea plant the church cultivates.”  Sean K Reynolds et al (2014). Inner Sea Gods, p 73. Paizo, Inc.

There’s so much in that one sentence, and my game doesn’t start for hours, so here goes.

Cleric of Gozreh

Cleric of Gozreh

Gozreh (in a nutshell) [digression: great, now I’m imagining that like the picture of Venus on the half shell]: a god of nature, sea, and weather and is depicted as either male or female, depending on the context.

“at least one garment” & “the church cultivates”:  This implies that kimlé may not be readily available, and is specifically cultivated for liturgical garb.

“linen-like cloth”: This presumably means it is a bast fibre, like linen and ramie. [digression: also stinging nettles which explains The Wild Swans by Hans Christian Anderson.  I never understood the mechanics of making nettles into fabric.] Bast fibres are the inner bark of plants, softened (mechanically or chemically) and spun into yarn to be woven (or knit) into fabric.  Bast fibres share several properties which distinguish them from cotton.  Bast fibres are stronger and don’t pill. They also feel cool to the touch and absorb moisture without feeling wet (very useful if you’re worshiping a sea goddess).  However, they can be coarse (depending on the internal shape of the plant) but get softer with use.

“sea plant”:  The natural colour of of linen is light brown, or um…. “linen”.  I’d like to imagine that the green in the cleric’s robes shown is the natural, unbleached state of kimlé.

One thing not mentioned in the sentence is name of the plant that produces kimlé.  English has a long tradition of using different words for the finished product and source material, eg: cattle vs beef, sheep vs mutton, flax vs linen. (The Norman Invasion is responsible for most of that, but this is the Fashions of Golarion, not the Languages of Golarion.) So does kimlé come from the kimlé plant, or some other plant?

There is (at least) one magic item made of kimlé and another that should be (and is, as of now, in my game version of Golarion).  The Kimlé Coat (Inner Sea Gods, pg 252) helps with swimming and water breathing.  The Featherscale Cloak (Inner Sea Gods, pg 264) does all kinds of neat bird- and fish-related things (including shape shifting), but is described as “heavy linen”.