Evil Queen of the Tengu

This one was a no brainer:

Queen of the tengu, (Pathfinder’s bird people).

Queen of the TenguI would make this cloak from the plumage of my vanquished foes, and in it I would command the fear and respect of my people… birds… whatever.

I usually use the runway shots, but when I saw this picture of Fan Bing Bing on Tom and Lorenzo, I knew she had to represent my Tengu Queen.

The dress is by George Chakra, and I just  discovered him through this picture.  Looking at his Couture Collections, it seems like he designs exclusively for the Evil Queens of Golarion.  (Please Paizo, in the name of Shelyn make that book happen.  Extra love for making a paper doll book!)

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New Blog Feature

I’m adding a new topic called “What I Would Wear if I was the Evil Queen (or Empyreal Lord) of X”

I love the runway shows that are on the more ridiculous side and less practical.  Every now and then, I’ll see a piece in a show that makes me think, “When I Become Evil Queen of the Universe, that’s what I’ll wear”  (Assuming that my ascension to Evil Queendom also includes a 6-foot skeleton and single digit BMI.)

First Region: Cheliax. (Yes, I realize the job is taken)

Thom Brown

Georges Hobeika

I couldn’t choose just one. Luckily being Evil Queen of Cheliax means you don’t have to choose!

The black and white is from Thom Brown‘s Fall 2014 Ready to Wear collection. The red is from Georges Hobeika‘s Fall 2013 Couture Collection.

They each have one of Cheliax’s signature colours, red and black and look sufficiently strong and beautiful.

Kimlé

(Lying on the couch, drinking excellent coffee, staring out the window at the rain, writing about imaginary fabric in an imaginary world, until I leave for my Pathfinder game. Today may be perfect)

As far as I can tell, kimlé gets its first mention in the Inner Sea Gods book.  It is described in the section on the clothing of Gozreh‘s worshipers:  “… at least one garment is usually made of kimlé, a linen-like cloth made of a sea plant the church cultivates.”  Sean K Reynolds et al (2014). Inner Sea Gods, p 73. Paizo, Inc.

There’s so much in that one sentence, and my game doesn’t start for hours, so here goes.

Cleric of Gozreh

Cleric of Gozreh

Gozreh (in a nutshell) [digression: great, now I’m imagining that like the picture of Venus on the half shell]: a god of nature, sea, and weather and is depicted as either male or female, depending on the context.

“at least one garment” & “the church cultivates”:  This implies that kimlé may not be readily available, and is specifically cultivated for liturgical garb.

“linen-like cloth”: This presumably means it is a bast fibre, like linen and ramie. [digression: also stinging nettles which explains The Wild Swans by Hans Christian Anderson.  I never understood the mechanics of making nettles into fabric.] Bast fibres are the inner bark of plants, softened (mechanically or chemically) and spun into yarn to be woven (or knit) into fabric.  Bast fibres share several properties which distinguish them from cotton.  Bast fibres are stronger and don’t pill. They also feel cool to the touch and absorb moisture without feeling wet (very useful if you’re worshiping a sea goddess).  However, they can be coarse (depending on the internal shape of the plant) but get softer with use.

“sea plant”:  The natural colour of of linen is light brown, or um…. “linen”.  I’d like to imagine that the green in the cleric’s robes shown is the natural, unbleached state of kimlé.

One thing not mentioned in the sentence is name of the plant that produces kimlé.  English has a long tradition of using different words for the finished product and source material, eg: cattle vs beef, sheep vs mutton, flax vs linen. (The Norman Invasion is responsible for most of that, but this is the Fashions of Golarion, not the Languages of Golarion.) So does kimlé come from the kimlé plant, or some other plant?

There is (at least) one magic item made of kimlé and another that should be (and is, as of now, in my game version of Golarion).  The Kimlé Coat (Inner Sea Gods, pg 252) helps with swimming and water breathing.  The Featherscale Cloak (Inner Sea Gods, pg 264) does all kinds of neat bird- and fish-related things (including shape shifting), but is described as “heavy linen”.

 

Holy Cow

Today’s word is “mozzetta” (Tomorrow’s will be: “kimlé”)

I’ve been reading (the important parts of) Inner Sea Gods. Each of the 20 main Golarion gods gets a paragraph or two about their temples.  And (more importantly) the fashions favored by their followers, both liturgical and secular.  I got about half way through (to Nethys) when the craziest thing happened: I learned a new fashion word — mozzetta. *sigh* Schooled in fashion vocabulary by an RPG book.  I feel shame as a free action.  Do I have to turn in my fashion card?

I was obviously distraught, because later the same day I ran the Erylium encounter in “Rise of the Runelords”, and every single PC survived. To add insult to injury, they weren’t even interested in the silk dress they found.  What’s a tiny creature doing with a medium sized dress? (In this case, she was using it as a nest)  Where did she get it?  This could be the biggest Fashion Mystery in Sandpoint since Father Zantus’s turtleneck!

Speaking of, I told one of my players about learning a new word, and without missing a beat she asked, “Does it mean ‘anachronistic blue turtleneck’?”.

Unrelatedly, wanna see a picture of a cow wearing a mozzetta?  F. Wesley Schneider has one.  That’s gotta be a mozzetta, right?  I kind of hope they don’t correct it so my witch can get a robe that comes with a stylish, bovine animal companion.

HSF #2 — Innovation – Raglan Sleeve

This post introduced some of the technological innovations that appear in Father Zantus’s turtleneck.  This post will explore Raglan Sleeves.

The most notable characteristic of Raglan sleeves, are that they attack to the neck of the shirt, rather than at the shoulder.  Shirts with Raglan sleeves have no shoulder seam, because the front and back pieces attach to the sleeve. (Oblig Wikipedia link).

The origin story of the raglan sleeve can be found here, among other places.  The super short version:  Lord Raglan lost his arm in the mid 1815s.  His tailor made him a custom coat with this new style of sleeve that would be easier for him to put on and take off.  I was half expecting to find references to earlier raglan sleeves, on the assumptions that, like Mathematical Theorems, sleeves are never named for their originator.  (Stigler’s law). I didn’t find any, but that doesn’t mean they don’t exist.

Almost-raglan spencer

Early 19th century spencer, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

I did, however find some “so close, yet so far” examples.  These both come from the early 19th century, the same period where Raglan lost his arm.  This spencer (the tiny little jacket) and dress are have so little in the way of shoulders, that the sleeves attach to a couple of inches of fabric around the neckline.  They didn’t make that final step of eliminating the neck band altogether.

Almost raglan sleeve dress

Dress, 1810-1915, also from The Met.

 

That Hat — Part 2

In the first post about That Hat, I engaged in idle speculation of the origins of the hat, but that ends now that I have the adventure.

I got my copy of “The Half Dead City” today, and (of course) the first thing I did was flip to the magic items section to see what magical properties That Hat had. Alas, That Hat is not magical. It belongs to an NPC (a wizard) who has a stat block, and no magic hat listed.

Here is the Truly Important (read: Fashion Related) information from her bio:

[she] eschews court gowns in favor of a Taldan dandy’s idea of an adventurer’s outfit. (Half-Dead City, by Jim Groves. pg 59)

Nailed It! Hats Off (Ha!) to whoever designed her look, and to the artists who brought her to life in the AP. She looks fantastically impractically foppish.

The only way That Hat would be more epic, is if it was being worm by a flumph.

If I wanted to declare That Hat to be magical, here’s how I would re-fluff wizard spells to use That Hat. These came from the generic wizard spell list, so don’t take them as spoilers as to which spells she has.

  • Charm Person/Hypnotism/Sleep — The target is distracted and enthralled by That Hat. (Hmm…. I must have failed my saving throw). The undulating movement of the feather in an unseen wind commands the target’s attention.
  • Comprehend Languages — The end of feather on That Hat inserts itself in the caster’s ear, and whispers translations, like a Bablefish.
  • Disguise Self/Alter Self — That Hat wraps itself around the caster’s face and moulds itself into the desired disguise.
  • Eagle’s Splendor — That Hat reveals itself in its true glory, granting a CHA bonus to the wearer.
  • Endure Elements — That Hat is well insulated in the winter and it’s massive surface dissipates heat in the summer.
  • Erase — The feather sweeps away the target writing.
  • Floating Disk — That Hat can magically float carrying a load.
  • Hiedeous Laughter — The target it tickled by the That Hat’s feather.
  • Mount — Assuming the caster isn’t worried about looking magical, That Hat expands and functions like a flying carpet.
  • Obscure Object/Nondetection — Putting That Hat over an object blocks scrying.
  • Prestidigitation — When the wearer of That Hat casts prestigitation to clean, the feather extends (as if it’s not long enough) and acts like a feather duster. Perfect for exploring dusty, old Osirian tombs.
  • Shield/Mage Armour/Protection From Arrows — That Hat swoops down in front of the caster, blocking missiles and attacks.

That’s levels 1 and 2.  Any ideas for 3 and higher?

Father Zantus’s Turtleneck

Father ZantusHSF #2 — Innovation

Introduction

This is the image that started this project. This is Father Zantus, the Cleric of Desna in Sandpoint, and an NPC in Rise of the Runelords. And he seems to be wearing a modern looking blue turtleneck sweater.  This lead me to the question:  What is the earliest this sweater could have existed on Earth, and assuming a quasi-medieval setting for Varisia.  I tried to make an adventure hook out of this fascinating fashion mystery, but my players refused to take the bait, and opted for goblin hunting instead.

Four technologies stand out in this turtleneck as possibly being anachronistic:

  1. Jersey Fabric
  2. Raglan Sleeve
  3. Turtleneck
  4. Bright Blue dye

I’ll explore each one in a post of its own.